Tamoxifen hot flashes

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  1. Tamoxifen hot flashes


    Hot flashes and night sweats are common in cancer survivors, particularly women, but they can also occur in men. Treatment options are broad-based, including hormonal agents, nonhormonal pharmacotherapies, and diverse integrative medicine modalities.[1] Hot flashes occur in approximately two-thirds of postmenopausal women with a breast cancer history and are associated with night sweats in 44%.[2,3] For most breast cancer and prostate cancer patients, hot flash intensity is moderate to severe. Sweating can be part of the hot flash complex that characterizes the vasomotor instability of menopause. Physiologically, sweating mediates core body temperature by producing transdermal evaporative heat loss.[4,5] Hot flashes accompanied by sweating that occur during the sleeping hours are often called Approximately 20% of women without breast cancer seek medical treatment for postmenopausal symptoms, including symptoms related to vasomotor instability.[7] Vasomotor symptoms resolve spontaneously in most patients in this population, with only 20% of affected women reporting significant hot flashes 4 years after the last menses.[7] There are no comparable data for women with metastatic breast cancer. Three-quarters of men with locally advanced or metastatic prostate cancer treated with medical or surgical orchiectomy experience hot flashes.[8] In this summary, unless otherwise stated, evidence and practice issues as they relate to adults are discussed. The evidence and application to practice related to children may differ significantly from information related to adults. When specific information about the care of children is available, it is summarized under its own heading. Causes of menopausal hot flashes include the occurrence of natural menopause, surgical menopause, or chemical menopause; in the cancer patient, chemical menopause may be caused by cytotoxic chemotherapy, radiation therapy, or androgen treatment. Tamoxifen will continue to be an important drug for the treatment of hormone-dependent breast cancer despite results suggesting that aromatase inhibitors will play an increasing role in the treatment of breast cancer for postmenopausal women . With more drugs available to treat patients with breast cancer, it is clear that patients would benefit from information that would allow their health care providers to individualize therapy. However, designing individualized therapies is complicated because for many drugs, including tamoxifen, the efficacies and toxicities differ among patients. The reasons for many of the interindividual differences are unknown. Despite its proven benefit, tamoxifen is known to have adverse side effects, including increased risks of endometrial cancer and vascular-related thrombotic events (i.e., stroke, venous thrombosis, and pulmonary emboli), as well as non–life-threatening side effects that can reduce quality of life and can affect patient compliance. Hot flashes, the most common side effect of tamoxifen, occur in up to 80% of women receiving tamoxifen . Although hormone replacement therapy is the most effective treatment for reducing hot flashes, its use in women with a history of breast cancer is generally not recommended because of a concern that pharmacologic doses of hormones could promote growth of subclinical breast cancer metastases.

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    Image source / stockimages. Searching for Tamoxifen Alternatives? One of the most searched phrases on the Internet for women fighting breast cancer is “tamoxifen alternatives”. Chemotherapy-induced medical menopause can cause hot flashes, as can hormonal therapies such as tamoxifen. Overall, the severity of hot flashes can vary from mild to moderate to severe. If you haven’t been warned about hot flashes, a sudden severe episode can be frightening it can have some of the same symptoms as a panic attack or a heart. Causes of “male menopause” include orchiectomy, gonadotropin-releasing hormone use, or estrogen use. Drug-associated causes of hot flashes and night sweats in men and women include tamoxifen, aromatase inhibitors, opioids, tricyclic antidepressants, and steroids.

    If you’ve had one, there’s no mistaking it: the sudden, intense, hot feeling on your face and upper body, perhaps preceded or accompanied by a rapid heartbeat and sweating, nausea, dizziness, anxiety, headache, weakness, or a feeling of suffocation. Some women experience an “aura,” an uneasy feeling just before the hot flash that lets them know what’s coming. Every woman’s experience is a little bit different. The flash is followed by a flush, leaving you reddened and perspiring. However, the faster you transition from regular periods to no periods, the more significant your hot flashes may be. Some premenopausal women who have their ovaries removed can experience severe hot flashes due to surgical menopause. Chemotherapy-induced medical menopause can cause hot flashes, as can hormonal therapies such as tamoxifen. Overall, the severity of hot flashes can vary from mild to moderate to severe. If you haven’t been warned about hot flashes, a sudden severe episode can be frightening: it can have some of the same symptoms as a panic attack or a heart attack. Compared to chemotherapy, tamoxifen has fewer side effects. Menopausal symptoms (such as hot flashes) are common in women who take tamoxifen [75]. Although menopausal symptoms may become less frequent and less intense over time, they can still be hard to manage. If you have symptoms, talk with your health care provider about ways to treat them. The most serious health risks of tamoxifen, such as endometrial cancer (cancer of the lining of the uterus) and blood clots in the lungs, are rare [75]. Figure 5.10 lists some possible side effects and health risks of tamoxifen in women. Although both aromatase inhibitors and tamoxifen can cause menopausal symptoms such as hot flashes, many of their side effects differ. Learn about how the side effects of these hormone therapies compare.

    Tamoxifen hot flashes

    Hot Flash on Tamoxifen Metabolism JNCI Journal of the., Menopause Symptoms Hot Flashes -

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  3. Relief from Hot Flashes The Natural, Drug-Free Program to Reduce Hot Flashes, Improve Sleep, and Ease Stress Gary Elkins PhD ABPP ABPH on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Available to the public for the first time, a groundbreaking, non-hormonal treatment, proven to reduce hot flashes by 80% on average Based upon a decade of research conducted by Dr. Gary Elkins

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    Compared to chemotherapy, tamoxifen has fewer side effects. For example, tamoxifen doesn't cause nausea. Side effects in women. Menopausal symptoms such as hot flashes are common in women who take tamoxifen. Although menopausal symptoms may become less frequent and less intense over time, they can still be hard to manage. Tamoxifen and raloxifene have been shown to reduce the risk breast cancer, but they can have their own risks and side effects. Tamoxifen and raloxifene are the only drugs that are approved in the US to help lower the risk of breast cancer, although for some women, drugs called aromatase. May 29, 2002 -- A drug commonly used to calm seizures may also provide relief from tamoxifen-induced hot flashes in women with breast cancer. A small study shows the drug Neurontin can reduce or.

     
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    Metformin is a type of oral medication used to treat type 2 diabetes — and according to Gary Scheiner, CDE, in his book, “Until There is a Cure,” metformin is the most prescribed medication for type 2 diabetes. But type 1 diabetics can take metformin, too, explains Scheiner, if they’re struggling with insulin resistance and persistent high blood sugars. The brand names for metformin are Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Glumetza, Fortamet, and Riomet. Metformin has also been with other medications, giving you two diabetes treatment methods in one medication. Those combo-medications are: glyburide (Glucovance), glipizide (Metaglip), rosiglitazone (Avandamet), pioglitazone (Actoplus Met), sitagliptin (Janumet) and repaglinide (Prandi Met).[Download our free Guide to Type 2 Diabetes Medications]Metformin is taken in pill-form. It is generally taken twice per day, at breakfast and at dinner. For those with higher levels of insulin resistance, your doctor may prescribe metformin to be taken at all three meals: breakfast, lunch, and dinner. Metformin Side Effects - Diabetes Home Page Metformin - Diabetes Self-Management Center Console - Parker Boats
     
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